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Moving women in tech forward. Together.

September 16, 2014 at 5:21pm
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The Entrepreneur On A Mission To Change Women's Media →

September 6, 2014 at 11:35pm
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2 ways quotas for women raise quality - Curt Rice →

11:31pm
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Source

Source

11:30pm
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Because when it comes to guys, we have whole fandoms bending over backwards to write soulful meta humanising male characters whose actions, regardless of their motives, are far less complex than monstrous. We take male villains and redeem them a hundred, a thousand times over – men who are murderers, stalkers, abusers, kinslayers, traitors, attempted or successful rapists; men with personal histories so bloody and tortured, it’s like looking at a battlefield. In doing this, we exhibit enormous compassion for and understanding of the nuances of human behaviour – sympathy for circumstance, for context, for motive and character and passion and rage, the heartache and, to steal a phrase, the thousand natural shocks that flesh is heir to; and as such, regardless of how I might feel about the practice as applied in specific instances, in general, it’s a praiseworthy endeavour. It helps us to see human beings, not as wholly black and white, but as flawed and complicated creatures, and we need to do that, because it’s what we are.

But when it comes to women, a single selfish or not-nice act – a stolen kiss, a lie, a brushoff – is somehow enough to see them condemned as whores and bitches forever. We readily excuse our favourite male characters of murder, but if a woman politely turns down a date with someone she has no interest in, she’s a timewasting user bimbo and god, what does he even see in her? Don’t get me wrong, I’ve seen some great online meta about, for instance, the soulfulness and moral ambiguity of Black Widow, but I’ve also seen a metric fucktonne more about what that particular jaw-spasm means in that one GIF of Cumberbatch/Ackles/Hiddleston/Smith alone, and that’s before you get into the pages-long pieces about why Rumplestiltskin or Hook or Spike or Bucky Barnes or whoever is really just a tortured woobie who needs a hug. Hell, I’m guilty of writing some of that stuff myself, because see above: plus, it’s meaty and fun and exactly the kind of analysis I like to write.

And yet, we tend overwhelmingly not to write it about ladies. It’s not just our cultural obsession with pushing increasingly specific variants of the Madonna/Whore complex onto women, such that audiences are disinclined to extend to female characters the same moral/emotional licenses they extend to men; it’s also a failure to create narratives where the women aren’t just flawed, but where the audience is still encouraged to like them when they are.

— Gender, Orphan Black and the Meta of Meta

August 30, 2014 at 3:44pm
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The abrasiveness gap: high-achieving men and women are described differently in reviews

The abrasiveness gap: high-achieving men and women are described differently in reviews

3:42pm
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Why Women Don’t Apply for Jobs Unless They're 100% Qualified →

It’s because we don’t know how the hiring process works. 

August 28, 2014 at 1:54pm
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I will raise a slightly academic point that I believe needs to be raised more often: Women in tech aren’t an issue if you understand technology in a broad sense. Women are nurses, women are bioengineers, women manage all sorts of machines in a lot of capacities and industries which require a high level of technical skill. Women in tech is a framing device that has limited value. This is not to say that women are common in executive roles or even in any role in startups, but women are considered a problem with or without coding or executive skills. We live in a world where being born a woman is a dangerous proposition.

— Margarita Noriega of Fusion: 'Women in tech is a framing device with limited value' in Forbes

August 21, 2014 at 1:19pm
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Mark Suster, VC at Upfront Ventures in conversation with Nanea Reeves, President and COO of textplus. Things they discuss include:

  • Office politics – including Nanea’s experience being a woman in technology
  • The communication styles of men vs women including their experiences that men are quick to take credit for successes and to try and one-up their colleagues competitively whereas often women are not as assertive in claiming credit even when it’s due

1:14pm
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Victoria Song: We Can Create Our Own Opportunities →

9:54am
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Zaleski estimates about half PowerToFly’s workforce is mothers. (“One of our theses is that working mothers are the most efficient work goup in many ways,” she said. “They’ll tell you exactly when they will get something done.”) Lots of others are women who can’t afford to move to geographic areas with lots of tech jobs. Some are overseas, a situation that can be very complicated for companies who want to hire them. Others have long commutes. Others just need a new gig.

— Great article looking at a new startup called Power to Fly that’s focussing on getting women employed - by their rules.